NASA Moon Rocket Lifted Off On Maiden Mission 50 Years Ago

NASA Moon Rocket Lifted Off On Maiden Mission 50 Years Ago

Inspiration for this project came from several people on Reddit posting their design of the rocket taking off inside an Ikea glass case. As my rocket already hangs on the ceiling (and the Ikea glass case houses my girlfriend’s elephant collection), I wanted to make an alternative design. After many attempts, I managed to make a 3D design for a holder that could hold the light in place in the center of the rocket. I tried to design and print many different variations, which you can see below. The three things you have to print can be found on Thingiverse. The biggest thing you have to print is the center console, which fits in the rocket. The Apollo 4 command module, the only part of that first Saturn V mission to be recovered, is now on exhibit at the Infinity Science Center in Mississippi.

I feel the same emotions as I did when I saw it happen the first time. I saw other people using cotton, so I bought some in the supermarket. If someone finds a way to lead to the electric cable through the rocket itself using original lego, that would be very welcome. We prepared a simple simulation of the above scenario using the familiar atmosphere and Cd vs. Mach characteristics from Saturn-V documentation. On October 25, 2016, the last of the recorded data from the historic Pluto flyby was obtained from New Horizons design by Marco Brambilla. New Horizons is an interplanetary space probe that was launched as part of NASA’s New Frontiers program to perform a flyby study of the distant dwarf planet Pluto and its quintet of icy moons–especially its large moon Charon.

The Hubble Space Telescope can observe near-ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared light. The electricity wire for the light is guided along the top of the rocket, so it’s not too distracting when walking underneath it. Embedding this light in the rocket was the biggest challenge. This would also allow me to address my biggest issue with the other designs: the flames look too tame for a launching rocket. The only downside is that it is “gravity-assisted,” which means the flames might look like they go into the motor instead of coming out of it. It can also be configured to always stay on if you don’t like the flickering part. In the end, settled for two rings, you can fit over the rocket, put wooden sticks in (I used skewers with a length of 20cm), and can glue cotton on (I used a glue gun for this).